Tag Archives: Bobby Brown

Bobby Brown – Don’t Be Cruel

Bobby Brown
Don’t Be Cruel
June 20, 1988
MCA RecordsUMG
080/100Bobby Brown - Don't Be Cruel

1. Cruel Prelude // 2. Don’t Be Cruel // 3. My Prerogative // 4. Roni // 5. Rock Wit’cha // 6. Every Little Step // 7. I’ll Be Good to You // 8. Take It Slow // 9. All Day All Night //10. I Really Love You Girl // 11. Cruel Reprise

Bobby Brown was once more than an ex-New Edition member and Whitney Houston’s ex-hubby (a faulty marriage well documented because Brown and Houston are ex-reality tv. stars as well as recording artists).
He was at one point R&B’s brightest young star as well as the archetypical boy band bad boy, that point was following the release of his sophomore album Don’t Be Cruel. When Robbie Williams gave Take That and Nigel Martin-Smith the finger to find bigger success solo than the group had ever had collectively he was basically following Bob’s career trajectory. When Donnie Wahlberg tried to set fire to a hotel with a Molotov cocktail… well I don’t think Bobby ever did something that fucked up, but the man has had plenty of lewd and laviscous content, driving under influence, police chase, resisting arrest and drug posession arrests on his name as well as the public image of a crackhead wifebeater. To each former teen heartthrob his own way of shedding the bubblegum pop image. Word to Justin Bieber.

Don’t Be Cruel was released at the height of the New Jack Swing era which supposedly blends old-fashioned R&B soul with old school hip-hop although acts like Guy, Al B. Sure! and Keith Sweat are simply soul singers with more electronic production than was usual in the ’80s backing them in my book with little to no hip-hop influences being noticeable, but that is just my opinion so you can ignore that if you want to.
Brown however did blur the line between soul and hip-hop rapping as much as he sings on the title track and doing an LL Cool J-esque rap on the ballad Roni and busting out a verse at the end of the video edit of Every Little Step adding hip-hop swagger to his rhythm and blues.

The producers involved L.A. Reid, Babyface and Teddy Riley had all had moderate success in the music business before Cruel (Teddy working on all those Uptown records and L.A. and Face as in-house producers for Dick Griffey’s SOLAR records.) but were to completely own mainstream contemporary R&B in the decade that was to follow this album’s release. It’s not difficult to see why, their work on this album is excellent. One could say that they kickstarted the ’90s with this and it wouldn’t be much of an overstatement.

If the first five songs following the intro aren’t the best five-song-run on an R&B album ever they’re up there with the best of them. From the title track’s slinky, sinister funk through My Prerogative‘s brassy middle-fingerfest. Roni‘s B-boy romanticism, Rock Wit’cha‘s more mature sexy business and Every Little Step‘s puppy love and pop ‘n’ lock groove. This is some terrific music making, with Bob’s charismatically gruff Rick James/James Brown-ish tenor locking tightly into the groove of the somersaulting drum machine clatter. He isn’t the best technical singer out there, having a rather limited vocal range, but he knows well how to stay in it while at the same time making full use of everything he’s got and is a born entertainer. What’s more is that his sense of rhythm is excellent and he appears to really enjoy singing these catchy songs with a natural charisma that allows him to come across as both badass and as a fun individual, a loveable rascal. It is one rather engaging, catchy affair. These songs were all in the top three of the US R&B charts, in the top ten of the US pop charts with three of them hitting #1 in the former and one, namely My Prerogative, hitting #1 on the latter and copping a Grammy. And well deserved.

If this album consisted of only these five songs Don’t Be Cruel would be a perfect ten. Following them however are four well meaning but forgettable cuts. I’ll Be Good to You is standard fare late-’80s Teddy Riley-funk. It’s not bad but it absolutely pales in comparison to his other contribution My Prerogative, the album’s biggest pop-hit and a Grammy winner. (A little bit of trivia: Boy George’s 1989 Teddy Riley-produced, hit-single Don’t Take My Mind On a Trip was originally slated to appear on Don’t Be Cruel. It’s easy to imagine Bobby perform it. I would love to hear Bob’s version if any of you readers has it on a hard drive somewhere.) And closing the album are three rather forgettable slow jams Bob himself co-produced with Cameo-frontman and King of Stage-producer Larry White that require more technical singing than Bob has to offer to bring them to life.

In short Don’t Be Cruel has a fan-fucking-tastic opening run but slightly falls apart at the end. But overall it still is a really good but somewhat forgotten album that packs more hits and more punch than you can shake a stick at and proving just why he was a thing once. It is the best New Edition album, solo or otherwise. For that it derserves to be aknowledged and revisited.

Best tracks
Don’t Be Cruel
My Prerogative
Roni
Rock Wit’cha
Every Little Step

Recommendations
Pick this up.

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Bobby Brown – King of Stage

Bobby Brown
King of Stage
December 11, 1986
MCA RecordsUMG
065/100
Bobby Brown - King of Stage
1. Girlfriend // 2. Girl Next Door // 3. Baby I Wanna Tell You Something // 4. You Ain’t Been Loved Right // 5. King of Stage // 6. Love Obsession // 7. Spending Time // 8. Seventeen // 9. Your Tender Romance

While New Edition was rebooting the Platters and Maurice Starr was rebooting New Edition, Bobby Brown, whose ties with all these people were severed, was busy recording his solo-debut album King of Stage. Most people who followed New Edition would probably have sworn that Ralph, being that he sang all the leads and was arguably the best singer out the group (until Johnny Gill became a member anyway), would be not only the first one to have a solo album but would also become the brightest star. Unfortunately for Tresvant Brown got to do both those things after his bandmates voted him out of the group in late 1985.

Bobby Brown’s solo career is most remembered – when it isn’t completely and unfortunately eclipsed by the memory of all that Bobby-Whitney stuff – for his sophomore album Don’t Be Cruel, which along with debut albums by Keith Sweat and Guy helped popularise new jack swing, an R&B-mutation that combined early hip-hop’s hard-hitting drums and minimal melody with classic soul’s smoothed-out sung vocals (although most New Jack Swing artists also rapped on their own records at the very least every once in a while).

King of Stage is a rap-soul hybrid as well, but a more primitive, less integrated one. And bar the title track nothing on here could remotely be considered hip-hop or strongly hip-hop influenced like his subsequent work. Basically this album’s instrumentals are typical ’80s funk-jams and slow dancers, with one imitation RUN-DMC beat thrown in for good measure, mostly provided by Cameo-frontman Larry Blackmon as well as Isaac Hayes/Isley Brothers/Aretha Franklin songwriter Michael Lovesmith and Boston club DJ John Luongo, over which Bobby mostly sings but busts out the occasional LL Cool J’s I Need Love-esque rap verse too. The resulting album is a lot more funky, ballsy and swaggering than anything NE came up with, as was to be expected since Brown was rather vocal about resenting his (by the time of this album’s release former) group’s bubblegum image and sound, which is one of the reasons he got excommunicated by his mates in the first place. Brown appears to delight in his chance to be a grown up-type of soul singer, which results in a more than halfway decent album that’s a lot more expressive and a lot less gimmicky than what NE ever did. The comparison with Under the Blue Moon is especially beneficial (although that’s as much Under the Blue Moon‘s fault as it is King of Stage‘s merit.)

The appeal of this album is for the most part personality-based. Bobby isn’t the best singer or the best rapper around, nor is a he handed the most memorable set of songs to perform. It’s all in the fairly decent yet somewhat unremarkable zone. But then there’s Bobby’s undeniable natural charm and a boyish buoyance that do work some magic. Bob is a born entertainer. Though a confident performer he also appears to well know the limits of his gruff tenor. The vocalists that appear to inspire him are Rick James and James Brown, and though he’s nowhere near as talented as these two greats he does seem to have learnt the right lessons from them. Like the hardest working man in showbiz he punctuates his songs with the more-than-occasional joyous grunt.

Girlfriend, his first solo-single hit number one on the U.S. R&B charts when it came out and it’s a nice little ’70s inspired love song, complete with saucy sax and it would’ve slipped seamlessly onto either New Edition or All For LoveGirl Next Door is a synthy funk number that shows the Cameo influence while still allowing Bob’s individuality to shine through, and the same can be said for the similarly minded Baby I Wanna Tell You Something. On the title track Bob rhymes about over a Jam Master Jay-aping beat that appears to incorporate a James Brown vocal sample (Since this was released before the sample wars nobody is credited so one can never be sure.) Bouncy up-tempo cuts like Love Obsession and Your Tender Romance summon the mental image of Axel Foley driving his convertible through LA, and whether that works as a good thing you can make out for yourself.

Obvious missteps are Seventeen, a misguided stab social commentary on a girl getting off track and pregnant and on sex and drugs. It doesn’t only sound ridiculous and hypocritical coming from Bob, knowing that soon enough he himself would be off track and on drugs, but it also isn’t a very good song that tries to accomplish drama through crappy ’80s synths (Yes I am aware King of Stage was recorded in the ’80s), and the fairly boring ballad Spending Time that has Bob trying to breathe life into it with all his might, but accomplishing little but showing the limits of his vocal range.  As a whole however King of Stage works more often than it doesn’t.

Kudos to the people at MCA for having the sense to keep this album brief at nine songs and including mostly good ones to boot. Bobby’s debut is a pretty decent attempt at establishing a career and a musical identity outside of NE with songs such as King of Stage and Your Tender Romance, while still catering to the audience of his former group with Girlfriend and Girl Next Door. It may not have been the massive breakthrough hit he wanted, but it was succesful enough for the record label to let him record another album. And record another album he did, but we’ll get to that when we get to that.

Best tracks
Girlfriend
Girl Next Door
King of Stage
Your Tender Romance

Recommendations
If you’re into ’80s R&B that may not be very substantial but does pack a punch, and you happen to come across this for a reasonable price a purchase may be in order.


New Edition – All For Love

New Edition
All For Love
November 8, 1985

MCA RecordsUMG
070/100
New Edition - All For Love
1. Count Me Out // 2. A Little Bit of Love (Is All It Takes) // 3. Sweet Thing // 4. With You All the Way // 5. Let’s Be Friends // 6. Kickback // 7. Tonight’s Your Night // 8. Whispers In the Bed // 9. Who Do We Trust // 10. School // 11. All For Love

By the time All For Love dropped New Edition was on a roll. Their indie label debut Candy Girl had put the five boys from Boston firmly on the map in ’83. The following year major label MCA had bought them out of their recording contract leaving them heavily in debt to their new employers, but their self-titled sophomore album was pretty successful and went a long way in helping to recoup MCA’s investment and solving NE’s debt. It should therefor come as no surprise that their third album serves up more of the stuff that made their previous disc go double platinum. Sunny R&B-pop with absolute alpha male and Michael Jackson-emulator extraordinaire Ralph Tresvant on leads and the other four guys mostly in backup capacity, snagging up the occasional lead vocal when Ralph was out of the booth taking a piss or something. And all of the guys were apparently content with that.

Well, all but oneAll For Love would be the last New Edition album released before Bobby Brown decided to start a solo-career, ostensibly because according to him All For Love sounds like he might as well had already left before they started recording it. (He’s not entirely right, he pops up on Count Me OutKickback and School and Who Do We Trust is mostly his show, but over the course of this album he doesn’t get as much time on leads as Ralph does, so he was right about that.) But we’ll get to Bob’s solo adventures soon enough.

This album is an enjoyable enough sequel to New Edition. It’s a bit harder, crisper and more electro funkafied and danceable than what they did the last time around. But that’s speaking relatively only to their last album, off course. You can still just picture your grandmother walking into the room while All For Love is on, and commenting on N.E. being “Such nice boys”. There’s no real edge of any sort. Which was supposedly the other reason for Bobby to get himself kicked out leave. He didn’t agree with the artistic direction they were headed in. (Looks like Robbie Williams took notice.) But for this album’s intents and purposes that may not be such a bad thing. The hooks are still as catchy as ever and Ralph is still as good an MJ update as he was the last time around.

Count Me Out has Ralph explaining why he can’t hang with the gang because he has to do stuff with his lady while Bobby, Ricky, Ronnie and Mike doing their best to convince him to do otherwise because no-one will come to the New Edition shows when he’s not there and it’s got cute and catchy conceptual songwriting that today’s teen pop/R&B could use more of.
A Little Bit of Love (Is All It Takes) is a slow, romantic electro-funk groove that either or both of your parents at some point may have done the robot to.
Sweet Thing could be the intro to an ’80s sitcom about a white suburban family with a strict but just father with a golden heart, an overbearingly loving and understanding mother, an insecure teenage daughter, a quirky preteen son and a dog who get into shenanigans together, and it summons exactly that type of cozy mood.
With You All The Way could be about giving up one’s virginity if it were sung by a girl, but since it’s Tresvant it’s about sticking with a loved one through thick and thin. Unless you’re part of the twerk generation there’s a small chance you’ll get laid if you put this on while in a romantic situation with a girl.
Let’s Be Friends has the boys friendzoning some girls because they’re “going too fast”, which may or may not be something that guys actually did in 1985 (For the record, I don’t think they did).
And the rest of the songs with titles KickbackTonight’s Your NightWhispers In Bed, Who Do You TrustSchool and All For Love are exactly what you expect of them if you know what NE is all about.

All For Love is a lot like today’s teen pop albums by the likes of Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus with age-appropriate songs about romantic situations, except more fun and soulful and with a vintage veneer that makes everything sound more classy than it in reality probably is.
The album does nothing to push either NE or music as a whole forward by fucking with new sounds, in fact it sounds like the last album they did, this one must concur to mr. Brown, “that New Edition of the Jackson 5” stuff remains the mantra the producers, songwriters and Ralph appear repeated when working on this, as they had since their debut. But besides the preachy, old-school hip-hop inluenced School there are no real missteps, and I’ll be damned if it isn’t an entertaining collection of music. And if that’s what you’re looking for in music you’ve just found it.

Best tracks
Count Me Out
A Little Bit of Love (Is All It Takes)
With You All the Way

Recommendations
Pick this one up.


New Edition – New Edition

New Edition
New Edition
July 6, 1984
MCA RecordsUMG
073/100
New Edition - New Edition
1. Cool It Now // 2. Mr. Telephone Man // 3. I’m Leaving You Again // 4. Baby Love // 5. Delicious // 6. My Secret (Didja Get It Yet?) // 7. Hide & Seek // 8. Lost In Love // 9. Kind of Girls We Like  // 10. Maryann

New Edition jumped ship from Maurice Starr’s Warlock Records to major label MCA Records as soon as they got the chance, which was both the only logical next step in NE’s career, since there was perhaps more star potential in the group than a small indie label could manage, and a complete bitch-move, because Starr had put the boys on big time.

The new label and producers however cannot be accused of being unfaithful to Starr’s vision of pushing a rebooted, contemporary Jackson 5 to the masses, especially on the uptempo hit singles Cool It Now and Mr. Telephone Man on which Jacksons-esque vocal harmonies are combined with synthy ’80s post-disco and rapping, which had just been invented at the time but was steady on the rise in becoming a thing.

Although post-disco electro-pop dominates the record there is also decent quiet storm efforts such as I’m Leaving You Again and Lost In Love, and even a sort of Kool and the Gang-esque disco-doo wop hybrid with a saucy sax solo called Maryann, closing the album. New Edition sounds as though it could just as well have been released on Dick Griffey’s SOLAR records.

While Cool It Now remains every bit as much breezy dancefloor fun as it must have been when it initially hit the charts, the Ray Parker, jr.-helmed (of the Ghostbusters theme-fame)  Mr. Telephone Man sounds a lot more dated, both because of the outdated technology that its pun revolves around, and because of its quaint conceptual songwriting itself. It’s still a good song, but you can pretty much carbon date it to it’s release date as a single in late november ’84, using nothing but common sense.

Some of the other sounds, such as Baby Love, which has an instrumental that summons the mental image of the dramatic opening-credits sequence of a bad ’80s cop movie, are also going to be helpful when the archaeologists are digging this up, kinda like I’m doing now.

The occasional loss of lyrical relevance or overdramatic musical backing aside though, New Edition, like its predecessor Candy Girl is some terrific teen-pop stuff. Catchy, clean, somewhat modestly produced and sweet without being unnecessarily corny, well sung, well written and with ten tracks (together clocking at 43:13 minutes) not overstaying its welcome.

Compared to Candy Girl New Edition is a lot more slick and polished, which is to be expected when you go from an indie label like Warlock to a major one like MCA. It also sounds more varied, which can attributed to the use of multiple songwriters/ producers rather than Candy Girl‘s monolithic Maurice Starr-helmed musical backing. It also helps that this album sounds more like a group effort that their debut, with Bobby Brown snagging a lead from absolute alpha male Ralph Tresvant on Hide and Seek, everybody popping up somewhere on this record rapping or singing, and the whole group getting some shine together on Mr. telephone ManKind of Girls We Like and Maryann, as well as the group’s own compositions making it to the cut, and sounding just as good as the mterial the corporate songwriters brought them.

New Edition is some terrific pop music and deserves a revisit.

Best tracks
Cool It Now
Mr. Telephone Man
Hide and Seek
Lost In Love
Maryann

Recommendations
Pick this one up.


New Edition – Candy Girl

New Edition
Candy Girl
March 15, 1983
Streetwise/ Warlock
065/100
New Edition - Candy Girl
1. Gimme Your Love // 2. She Gives Me a Bang // 3. Is This The End? // 4. Pass the Beat // 5. Popcorn Love // 6. Candy Girl // 7. Ooh Baby // 8. Should Never Have Told Me // 9. Gotta Have Your Lovin’ // 10. Jealous Girl

Few guessed in 1983, when Candy Girl dropped, that this rather literal 1980s appropriation of the Motown-era Jackson 5’s career would in fact take off and never really die out (not even today, even if they’re not as big as they used to be). Since ’83 they have released seven group albums and every member has found some form of succes outside of the group. Bobby Brown being the best example, selling eight million copies of his sophomore Don’t Be Cruel. And every time the guys regroup they manage to rack up some interest with music audiences worldwide.

Few guessed that under the pressure of fame and fortune these kids would go on to hate one another’s guts, use lots of drugs, fight each other over lead vocal parts in songs, marry R&B divas, go K-Fed on said diva’s ’til divorce, and that in ’86 the “Bad Boy of the group” Bobby Brown would split from the group to succesfully start his own solo career by beefing up his sound and his image, setting the template for future male vocal groups and indivual members’ solo careers (see Take That and *NSYNC). Yet when his solo albums stopped selling simultaneously with Ralph’s, Bell Viv DeVoe’s and Johnny Gill’s (Bobby’s replacement in the group 1987-’88) they could all keep being rich R&B stars by putting their differences aside, reuniting and putting out a brand new New Edition album. (And when the money started coming in again, dropping the humility acts, picking up where the group left off, settle some scores and break-up again. Oh well.)

Yet all of these things were direct and indirect results of Bobby Brown, Michael Bivins and Ricky Bell (who lived in the same Boston housing projects) taking part in a talent show as Jackson 5 imitators. Producer Maurice Starr thinking that the boys could actually work as a profitable early eighties J5 equivalent and him signing them on the spot. At some point Ralph Tresvant came in and became the lead singer of the group (because he had that Motown Michael vocals down) and the cousin of their choreographer: Ronnie DeVoe would also parttake in what was supposed to be a New Edition of the Jackson Brothers mid-sixties incarnation.

Back to this album. As for updating the J5 soun for 1983, this is probably indeed what Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Michael and Marlon and/or Randy would’ve sounded like in ’83 if none of them had gone through puberty by that time. However, with the production clearly placed in the early ’80s through the incorporation of Zapp-esque basslines, melodies and vocoder parts, as well as the boys breaking out the occasional rap NE sported a sound that was instantly identifyable as being something new, rather than a dusted-off J5 album.

Most of these songs are sunny, mildly funky electronic pop-soul concoctions that may be a bit too cheerful, saccharine and exuberant for some people’s tastes (New Edition was after all the world’s first manufactured, producer-groomed boyband) but as far as teen-pop goes this is pretty terrific stuff. Hooky hooks, danceable instrumentation and lyrics that are simple but never nonsensical. Gimme Your LovePop Corn Love and Candy Girl stand out in particular, although Got to Have Your Lovin’ and She Gives Me a Bang (can you guess the recurring theme in these songs?) don’t fall far behind.

Is This the End? and Jeaulous Girl are pretty sweet dramatic-death-of-puppy-love ballads, and although Ralph can’t really fuck with mid-’70s Michael in this type of song (who can really?) he’s still got a lot more soul than your average teen heartthrob in the Justin Bieber/ Donny Osmond category.

The best thing on here however is Pass the Beat, a minimal Axel F-rip off of an electronic party groove that has all the boys passing the mic around and rap-singing their way past it. It’s the one song that in no way sounds like you know who and should get some people to “shake it, don’t break it” on the floor, were you throw it on at the house-party.

Candy girl is, like most teen pop albums, pure uncut fluff. It is however pretty good fluff. And while it doesn’t even hint at the greatness what was  to come in the form of follow-up albums and solo projects by its various members(bar maybe Pass the Beat)  it is more often than not bouncy, groovy, catchy music that’ll get you to tap your foot or nod you head or do whatever your music listening tic forces you to do. And for that it warrants a revisit.

Best tracks
Gimme Your Love
Popcorn Love
Candy Girl
Is This the End?
Pass The Beat

Recommendations
Pick this up if you find it for a reasonable price. It isn’t very substantial or very original, but the guys have nice voices and Maurice Starr gave them catchy songs. And if you don’t take it too seriously and don’t over-analise it you can have a lot of fun with it.


Ja Rule – The Last Temptation

Ja Rule
The Last Temptation
November 19, 2002
Murder Inc. Records/ Def Jam Recordings/ UMG
050/100
Ja Rule - The Last Temptation

1. Intro // 2. Thug Lovin’ (feat. Bobby Brown) // 3. Mesmerize (feat. Ashanti) // 4. Pop Niggas (feat. Pharrell) // 5. The Pledge [Remix] (feat. NaS, Ashanti & 2pac) // 6. Murder Reigns // 7. Murder Me (feat. Caddilac Tah & Alexi) // 8. The Warning // 9. Connected (feat. Eastwood, Crooked I & Chink Santana) // 10. Emerica (feat. Young Life & Chink Santana) // 11. Rock Star // 12. Destiny [Outro]

Ja Rule hadn’t really had any major backlashes in his career up until the gruff-voiced reincarnation of Luther Vandross released The Last Temptation. Sure, that Fiddy guy didn’t like him too much and his old homeboy DMX had said some less than complementary things about him on record, but his first three albums had all been multi platinum sellers and booty bumping with J-Lo on I’m Real [Remix] and Ain’t It Funny [Remix] sure had been fun. It also seemed that because of How to Rob nobody in the hiphop community liked mr. Cent, and his debut album had been shelved, and he himself had been dropped from his record label, making him not a force to be reckoned with in the rap game.

Then Curtis Jackson got signed again, arguably to the biggest powerhouse label in hip-hop: Eminem’s Shady Records. He was talking shit again, about how Jeffrey was a sellout R&B artist and a 2pac imitating wanksta, and this time the world listened and nodded. So The Last Temptation desperately needed to re-establish Ja’s credibility.

At the same time Ja’s previous album had him and Irv Gotti finding a winning formula: Ja posturing grimily over hella slick beats with Ashanti singing a hook. This had sold Ja boatloads of albums and a stack of hit singles. He also had an audience to satisfy. And audience that wanted him to reprise Always on Time a couple of times.

These two contradictory ideas that stand at the foundation of The Last Temptation, a fascinatingly schizofrenic listen with a lot of truly mystifying choices being made.

After a rant of an intro things start off well enough with Thug lovin’which pick Whitney Houston’s then-hubby Bobby Brown out of the crack rocks moth balls to aid Jeffrey in a smoothed-out song of rugged romance. Mesmerize is a decent sequel to Always on Time that samples, ironically enough, the same source material as Ghetto Qu’ran, the song that allegedly got F. Cent shot nine times. No surprises there, musically or lyrically.

Then Ja remembers the streets all of a sudden and invites Pharrell over for a DMX/Fiddy Cent disfest. Not much worth mentioning here except for that it raises the question whether or not Skateboard P willingly helped create a 50/X dis, or was simply asked for a beat and e-mailed his most generic, never even remembering the fact and being hella surprised when the Murder Inc. paycheck came in the mail.

Murder Reigns samples Toto’s Africa of all things and has Ja going all 2pac/martyr on the listener. Speaking of the man, his disembodied voice can be heard on the outro of The Pledge [Remix], which also samples his own So Many Tears, for the beat. That’s fucking blasphemous, and I’m not even really that much of a Pac fan. The fuck NaS!? Were you threatened with grievous bodily harm into participating with this ridiculous horseshit? It would seem that there’s even a subliminal Snoop Dogg-diss in Ja’s verse, this was most likely instigated by Suge who gets a shout-out.

The title track had Irv Gotti breaking out a Rappers Delight-esque faux disco beat, and features the Notorious B.I.G.’s one-time dip on the side Charlie Baltimore dueting Jeffrey, who reverts back to his old constipated Barry White with laryngitis tricks on the hook, making the song unlistenable even though Baltimore actually sounds pretty good.

Murder Me draws inspiration from Anniversary by Tony! Toni! Toné!, and has Ja breaking out some of the worst sex lyrics The Last Temptation‘s side of Pretty Ricky’s Your BodyThe Last Temptation is by far hip-hop’s largest, most decadent waste of a sampling budget since Puff Diddy reigned over the charts. But apparently they saved the money on guest appearances, because except for Pharrell’s blink-and-you’ll-miss-it appearance on Pop Niggaz and Nasir’s verse, there’s no one on here who wouldn’t work for food. One has to wonder whether Gotti ever truly considered releasing albums by the likes of Caddilac Tah and Young Life.

Because Suge cleared the 2pac raping-and-pillageing that was Pain on Pain is Love and The Pledge [Remix] on here, two Death Row records get to spit alongside Jeffrey on Connected. It’s a highlight, what with Chink Santana’s Nate Dogg-esque vocals on the hook and his Dat Nigga Daz aping beat and Crooked I and Eastwood providing the best verses on this project, bar NaS. Emerica is another ecstasy anthem and Ja’s worst one yet.

Rock Star goes for the tried-and-true throw-some-rock-guitars-on-a-hip-hop-song-and-hope-for-crossover-appeal gimmick. Fans of both genres should hang their heads in shame.

The outro is a pretty decent machine gun funk beat, and Jeffrey certainly does his best with it, but ultimately it’s too little, too late.

Ja Rule actually held the advantage in the 50 Cent thing, up to this point, having sold milions of records and with nobody knowing who Curtis was. With this album however he more or less killed his own career before 50’s practice round was even over and his first real blow, in the form of Get Rich or Die Trying was even delt by at the same time trying to please everyone and being so self important that he creates music that borders on self-parody.

Best tracks
Thug Lovin’
Mesmerize
Connected
Destiny [Outro]

Recommedations
The above songs are some fanstastic naughties nostalgia, but the rest of this album is a total waste of time and money, and needs not be touched with a ten foot pole.