Tag Archives: Carl Thomas

Memphis Bleek – The Understanding

Memphis Bleek
The Understanding
December 5, 2000
Get Low Records/ Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam Recordings/UMG
050/100
Memphis Bleek - The Understanding
1. Intro – U Know Bleek // 2. Do My… (feat. Jay-Z) // 3. I Get High // 4. We Get Low // 5. Change Up (feat. Jay-Z & Beanie Sigel) // 6. My Mind Right [Remix] (feat. Jay-Z, H. Money Bags & Beanie Sigel) // 7. Hustler (feat. Beanie Sigel) // 8. All Types of Shit // 9. PYT (feat. Jay-Z & Amil) // 10. Bounce Bitch // 11. They’ll Never Play Me  // 12. Everyday (feat. Carl Thomas) // 13. Is That Your Chick [Remix] (Jay-Z feat. Twista, Missy Elliott & Memphis Bleek) // 14. In My Life

Niggas said I can’t do it
Funny I done it
The album is here, now who the fuck want it?

And so commences the second album by Brooklyn rapper Memphis Bleek, a guy best known at the time for his shitty hit song Memph Bleek Is… of his equally shitty debut album Coming of Age named after the first Jay-Z song our host of the night ever made sound less appealing back in ’96.

But in all fairness, when we first got to hear Bleek in ’96 on Reasonable Doubt‘s Coming of Age, he was sixteen years old (an industry story goes that the person who was actually supposed to appear on that song was Wu-Tang clan affiliated at-the-time child-rapper Shyheim, who declined allowing Bleek to step in, for whatever ridiculous reason he must regret the shit out of today, considering what standing both Reasonable Doubt and Jay-Z have in today’s hip-hop game) and so there was a lot of room for growth for young Bleek as far as far as rapping skills were concerned from when we first heard him rap on.

Now Coming of Age didn’t show much signs of growth, and neither did the collaboration album The Dynasty: ROC la Familia with Jay-Z and Beanie Sigel but… but… *groan* let’s hope for the best shall we?

Basically Bleek has upped his game a bit. This album has actual highlights. Intro – U Know Bleek has a pretty decent celebratory Just Blaze instrumental and our host’s agressive, urgent flow works well enough. And clocking under two minutes neither overstays its welcome, even if Bleek asks the listener who the fuck wants his album, one people told him specifically he couldn’t make and condones his music inspiring school shootings.

I Get High is so fucking stupid (It’s a song about the merits of smoking pot while driving down the interstate, without a destination even being so much as considered) it makes a U-turn to hilarious, what with its straightfaced rap by Bleek and it’s tailor-made-to-get-baked-to instrumental. Try to take the train or the bus in stead of the car whenever so much as approaching the East-Coast of the United States though. Bleek never showed the ability to understand irony, so he probably literally likes to do this shit in real life.

And then there’s Is That Your Chick, an all-star posse song with Jay-Z, Twista and Missy Elliott on a banging-ass Timbaland beat. Good song but Bleek is a complete nonfactor. His two verses on the song (as opposed to his bos Jay-Zs’s three verses on the song) are the most skippable parts. For those caring, a slightly more explicit, Memphis Bleek-free version of the song titled Is That Your Bitch was released on the European version of Jay-Z’s Vol. 3 album that sounded both better and more concise than this. It was left off the USA version due to bootlegging, so Bleek got Timbo, Missy and Twista on his album due to a technicality. That doesn’t take away from that it is hands-down the best thing on here.

As for the rest of this album. Meh.

Do My and Bounce Bitch are generic, rude, unsexy club bangers. We Get Low sounds like Just Blaze miscarriaging Swizz Beatz musical child, while Bleek still fails to understand how to write a hook. And on Change UpPYT, My Mind Right and Hustlers he gets outclassed in turns by Beanie Sigel and/or Jay-Z with overall the results never really ending up on the right side of acceptable.

Also the closing track My Life samples I Wanna Know What Love Is by Foreigner, which bypasses the P. Daddy and heads straight for Pittbull levels of wrongful sampling.

Better luck next time, Bleek!

Best tracks
Intro – U Know Bleek
I Get High
Is That Your Chick?

Recommendations
Stay away from this shit. Get the Bleek-free version of Is That Your Chick off iTunes and, if you smoke pot and like to laugh, I Get High too.


Amil – A.M.I.L. (All Money Is Legal)

Amil
A.M.I.L. (All Money Is Legal)
September 19, 2000
Roc-a-Fella RecordsColumbia RecordsSME
055/100
Amil - All Money Is Legal

1. Smile 4 Me // 2. I Got That (feat. Beyoncé) // 3. Get Down // 4. Y’all Dead Wrong // 5. Heard It All (feat. Jay-Z) // 6. Quarrels (feat. Carl Thomas) // 7. Girlfriend // 8. All Money Is Legal (A.M.I.L.) // 9. That’s Right (feat. Jay-Z) // 10. Anyday // 11. Raw // 12. No 1 Can Compare // 13. 4 da Fam (feat. Jay-Z, Memphis Bleek & Beanie Sigel)

I don’t know what it is with rappers and their love for really, really fucking stupid acronyms. There was the Notorious B.I.G.’s crew Junior M.A.F.I.A. (Junior Masters At Finding Intelligent Attitudes), Drake’s motto Y.O.L.O., 2pac’s claim that N.I.G.G.A. stood for Never Ignorant in Getting Goals Accomplished (when everybody knows that in reality it is a misspelling of the word nigger) and when Noreaga was forced to change his rap name because the record label he had just left owned his nom de plume, he became N.O.R.E. (Niggaz on the Run Eatin’) and in september 2000 Roc-a-Fella rapper Amil followed suit by transforming her actual given name into something that was a) retarded and b) not likely to be what her mother ment when she gave her a name.

No, not all money is legal. You could state that you’re out for the loot, regardless of whether you acquire it legally or illegally, which is an attitude one can have towards money, I suppose. But this album title is a straight untruthful claim, and to make your album title a straight up lie such as what was the case with the last Roc-a-Fella release doesn’t promise much in the form of good music, to this reviewer at least. Also: the cover sorta kinda paraphrases the album cover of Lil’ Kim’s Hard Core which indicates all sorts of bandwagon-jumping.

Lastly, having heard several Amil guest appearances on other Roc-a-Fella projects, most of which were less than awe-inspiring, expectations for this album are low, which may end up in Amil’s advantage because it’ll be hard for her to disappoint.

To start with the positive: A.M.I.L. isn’t quite the shitstorm it could’ve been, the production courtesy of the likes of EZ Elpee, the Trackmasters, Rockwilder, Just Blaze, Ty Fyffe and less well-known producers is serviceable enough throughout the album, if a bit formulaic. Contemplative soul-sampling beat here, rock-tinged ass-shaker there, club banger this, R&B-hook that. Amil herself rides the beats professionally enough with her girlishly sultry voice. Yes, this is not the obknoxiousness that was Memphis Bleek’s Coming of Age.

But then neither is this actually entertaining like Beanie Sigel’s album, let alone Sauce Money’s overlooked masterpiece. This is the most middle of the road-album in reviewers recent memory, and it’s ll the more boring because of it. The second single, the Beyoncé featuring financially independent ladies anthem I Got That is a good metaphore for the entire disc. Technically sufficient but, whoever has found themselves yearning for some technically sufficient music? It is as though B. herself ony appears because All Money Is Legal is a joint venture between Roc-a-Fella Records and her label Columbia Records. (I wonder if this studio Session is where Jay and Bey met, not that there’s a trace of him on this song, mind you.)

All of these songs have been done before and since, better and worse, fom the All Saints-biting Get Down to the Neptunes-aping Rockwilder jams Y’All Dead Wrong and Girlfriend. On That’s Right Jigga and Amil do a back and forth over an early Just Blaze beat that seems to take all the wrong cues from Swizz Beatz. It makes one wonder just for what audience an album this bland is supposed to be and also why the real Swizzy and Pharrell decided to skip this one. Well Jay-Z, any help answering these questions? (What’s that Shawn? You don’t remember ever having an Amil signed to your label?)

Nevertheless there are a couple of good songs on here, although their sounding good mostly doesn’t have anything to do with the qualities of our star attraction.

The lead single, the Ty Fyffe produced Roc-a-Fella posse cut 4 Da Fam has a instrumental so majestic that it manages to make Memphis Bleek sound pretty good on his opening verse, moreso than Beanie Sigel even. Off course Shawn Carter drops by and erases all memory of any previous rappers. Our hostess doesn’t necessarily suck on here but she does sound like she doesn’t have any business appearing on record with these gentlemen. Nevertheless Jay-Z fans would do good checking it out.

Quarrels has Bad Boy Records R&B singer Carl Thomas provide some hauntingly soulful vocals over an ominous beat produced by EZ Elpee, one of P. Daddy’s Hitmen, leaving miss All Money Is Legal a particularly easy job holding the fort. Literally all she does or needs to do to make this work is exist.

Heard It All  has Jay-Z more or less dissing the shit out of Amil over a mellow acoustic guitar-laced Just Blaze co-production, until she herself gets to perform the cliché’d “female view on pimpin'” on the third verse, poorly. Which is quite amusing, mostly because reality would imitate the proceedingings of this song shortly after the release of this album.

Best tracks
Quarrels
4 da Fam

Recommendations
A.M.I.L. (All Money Is Legal) left me entirely blasé, and likely so will it you. Nevertheless the two above songs are okay enough to warrant a purchase off iTunes, Spotift or Amazon. Just don’t listen to the rest of this album.