Tag Archives: Kanye West

State Property – State Property

Various Artists
State Property (OST)
January 29, 2002
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam RecordingsUMG
075/100
State Property - State Property OST
1. Roc the Mic (Freeway & Beanie Sigel) // 2. Sun Don’t Shine (Young Chris, Oschino, Freeway & Neef) // 3. It’s Not Right (Freeway, Young Chris, Omilio Sparks & Beanie Sigel) // 4. Do You Want Me (Young Chris, Omilio Sparks & Oschino) // 5. Sing My Song (Omilio Sparks & Oschino) // 6. No Glory (Beanie Sigel) // 7. Bitch Niggas (Beanie Sigel & Omilio Sparks) // 8. Why Must I (Beanie Sigel & Omilio Sparks) // 9. International Hustler (Freeway) // 10. Hood I Know (Beanie Sigel, Freeway, Young Chris, Omilio Sparks & Oschino) // 11. Got Nowhere… (Beanie Sigel & Freeway) // 12. Trouble Man (Beanie Sigel, Omilio Sparks & Oschino) // 13. Don’t Realise (Beanie Sigel & Rell)

You know when a franchise is on a roll when it’s B-teamers get to ink their boys a deal and record an album with them. Off course calling Sigel a b-teamer wouldn’t be because of any sort percievable of lack of talent, mind you. Sigel is a B-teamer only because despite him doing alright for himself his albums never did Kanye West or Jay-Z numbers either because he wasn’t as likeable and hence markerable as either of those two superstar artists. Because he didn’t want to taint his gangsta rap albums with pop songs or probably both. The thing then that Beans brought to the table was raw street credibility. Just when Jay would lean a bit too far in the pop direction for hip-hop heads’ tastes Beans would bring out a cold hard gangsta rap album to keep Roc-a-fella Records’ street audiences happy.

It would be safe to say then that the records this guy did sell were sold to a small but dedicated fanbase who had no interest in compromising pop records, and that the same could be expected by an album coming from his protégés Freeway, Peedi Peedi, Young Chris, Neef, Omilio Sparks & Oschino. Catering to these expectations is exactly what State Property has done for their self-titled debut that also doubled as the soundtrack for Beanie Sigel & Co.’s movie debut, also called State Property (Had Beans learned nothing from Ma$e’s Harlem World, the group he named after his debut and how well that shit worked out?)
Now I personally haven’t seen this movie yet (and I have no immediate plans of doing so) but at least one person must have, because according to Wikipedia State Property (the movie) currently, twelve years following its release is still the reigning number one movie when it comes to utterences of the word ‘fuck’ per minute (bar a documentary on the word ‘fuck’ itself.) “Fuck is spoken 3.65 times per minute or 321 times in 88 minutes.” Wow. That should tell you exactly how much Beanie Mac cares about giving the media something they can play without giving their censors a burn out in in the process of preparing it for American mainsteam consumption.
This would also mean that the amout of ‘fucks’ uttered in the movie greatly exceeds that of the gangsta rap album that serves as its soundtrack. This is quite the achievement!
This in turn would mean that after shooting the movie the guys started to record the album but were *wait for it* literally out of fucks to give.

The opposite of this cornball-ass joke appears to have been the case. While every movie critic who saw it State Property (the movie) hated, hated, hated it, music critics actually took a liking to the album. And while not even Beanie Sigel’s mother could be convinced to buy a ticket for the film, State Property (the album) had a fairly healthy charts presence and could arguably be called succesful in its mission of launching the careers of Beans’ Philedelphia friends. Especially Freeway and the duo of Young Chris and Neef Buck who together record under the name Young Gunz. Both of these acts have had gold albums, which is good for them, but not necessarily good for Beans because when Beans left Roc-a-Fella Records to sign with Dame Dash’s new label and a beef between the Jiggaman and Mac ensued, most of State Property stuck with Jay-Z, apparently against his wishes.

Oh well, at least at the time when this album came out it was all good.. sorta. The fact that the album did so much better than the movie could be explained by the fact that State Property had been rapping for a while because they were rappers and this z-grade attempt at recording a b-movie was completely new to them.

The album kicks off with a club jam with Freeway handling the first and final verse, Sigel providing the creamy centre and both of them going back-and-forth on the hook. It’s a catchy song, but not your little sister’s birthday party kind of hip-hop song. Just Blaze’s beat is bouncy and a sparse kind of way and Sigel’s verse is all about the Notorious B.I.G. and firearms. It was the only single released of the album and sounds a lot more consise than that version with Murphy Lee and Nelly on it that appeared on Nellyville.
Following it is Sun Don’t Shine, a song about getting cornholed hardship in the hood with a crappy pseudo Neptunes instrumental backing up everyone but Sigel and Sparks. Speaking of Sparks: One would think that he’d have Pharrell’s phone number after helping to create the hook of I Just Wanna Love U (Give It 2 Me) so that he could arrange a real Neptunes beat. It is almost as though with these first two songs State Property tried to lure potential buyers into believing that this album was going to be a sequel of sorts to The Dynasty: ROC la Familia.

From there on however it is away with the pop and in with gloomy soul-sampling beats. It’s Not Right sounds a lot like a sequel to This Can’t Be Life, except with Jay and Scarface being replaced by Beans his boys. Matter of fact, Roc-a-Fella in-house R&B singer Rell notwithstanding, there are go guest appearances by non-State Property members, ROC or otherwise. Whether this was Jay giving Beans a vote of confidence that him and his boys could record a perfectly good album without his help and an apology for having the balls to include one of his own solo-songs on Beans’ solo-debut album the Truth for absolutely no reason at all or simply because Beyoncé’s bootylicious booty had just started keeping occupied to record music, and also because he was spending the lion’s share of State Property’s album budget with her in Mexico recording the ’03 Bonnie And Clyde video is not entirely clear to me. Apparently he did executive this album with his boys Dame Dash and Kareem Biggs. Which probably means that the triumvirate removed Memphis Bleek from the studio he was occupying to make room for the guys. But the result of this is that Sigel, Free and company get to run their own show and  that there’s no famous guest’s appearances to skip forward to, which means they have my full attention.

State Property keeps it grimy throughout. Even the come-on number for the ladies Do You Want Me, which has Chris, Sparks and Oschino on it, has the sort of creepy-ass beat, courtesy of Rick Rock, that suggests something else than hot romance. The fact that they guys all seem to be hollering at the same chick doesn’t really help. Moving on.
Sing My Song has Omilio singing his song poorly (but not poorly enough to grate on the ears) over a bluesy beat made by some cat called Zukhan, and dueting Oschino talking all sorts of ‘profound’ stuff about the ghetto life, and managing quite well to entertain.No Glory has the kind of beat that blends mafioso movie music with blaxploitation movie music and lets Sigel go rampant over it by his goddamn self spouting all kinds of violent nonsense but sounding as good and pissed off as ever. The beat even tricks you into believing it’ll switch up somewhere in the middle but it doesn’t. Tense.
Bitch Niggas is the anti-snitch that is mandatory on this type of album with Sparks and Sigel going for broke with it, not adding much to this particular sub-genre of gangsta rap, but sounding pretty awesome nevertheless, not in a small part thanks to it’s fine instrumental.
Why Must I jacks a George Clinton hook via Snoop’s What’s My Name and fails miserbly at doing anything good with it, mostly because this sort of thing has been done by every rapper ever since Jesus and his posse recorded the New Testament, and also because the first shitty beat since Sun Don’t Shine nearly derailed this entire listening experience.
International Hustler pairs Freeway with M.O.P.-producer DR Period for a rowdy excercise in gangsta non sequitors. It’s clear why after Beans Freeway would be the most succesful guy out of the crew.
Hood I Know, which has everyone in the crew except Neef on it, is a clunker again because of it’s car-commercial beat that is too glossy to be underground and too incomplete to succesfully be pop.
Got Nowhere… is Kanye’s only production contribution and it’s not bad a beat for Sigel and Freeway to duet over, although one would expect more from the billionaire, playboy, philantropist, artiste extraordinaire we know today. But then again back then he was only a ‘humble’ producer.
Trouble Man takes on a remorseful vibe and has Sparks, Sigel and Oschino wonder why they’ve so unfortunate in life early on. Yeah… Me neither, but it does sound good. And hey substance isn’t what this album is for.
The final track Don’t Realise pairs the albums biggest star Beanie Sigel with R&B singer Rell, a guy who to my knowledge had been signed to the Roc from the beginning but never was allowed near the studio when Jay was recording. It’s a nice upbeat way to end the evening.

Best tracks
Roc the Mic
It’s Not Right
No Glory
Bitch Niggas
International Hustler
Got Nowhere…
Don’t Realise

State Property is actually as good as Beanie Sigel’s then-latest album The Reason, which was good news for not only him, his fans, and these guys but also Jay-Z who went on to make a pretty penny off having these guys to his label. (And even though the movie allegedly sucked balls Beans got to create a State Property 2 as well, and got sent to prison so soon after that it can hardly be called a coincidence) But we’ll get to that when we will. For now to lovers of uncompromising but professionally made gangsta rap I recommend a purchase of this album.

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Jay-Z – The Blueprint

Jay-Z
The Blueprint
September 11, 2001
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam RecordingsUMG
085/100
Jay-Z - The Blueprint
1. The Ruler’s Back // 2. Takeover // 3. Izzo (H.O.V.A.) // 4. Girls, Girls, Girls (feat. Q-Tip, Slick Rick & Biz Markie) // 5. Jigga That Nigga // 6. U Don’t Know // 7. Hola’ Hovito (feat. Timbaland) // 8. Heart Of The City (Ain’t No Love) // 9. Never Change (feat. Kanye West) // 10. Song Cry // 11. All I Need // 12. Renegade (feat. Eminem) // 13a. Blueprint (Momma Loves Me) / 13b. Breathe Easy (Lyrical Exercise) / 13c. Girls, Girls, Girls [Part 2] (feat. Michael Jackson)

Released on the same date as the WTC attacks, september 11, 2001, Jay-Z’s fifth solo album of original material (sixth if you count The Dynasty: Roc la Familia as a Jay-Z solo album, which you definitely shouldn’t) sold tonnes of copies and recieved the kind of critical acclaim the Jiggaman  hadn’t seen since he dropped Reasonable Doubt. In the immortal words of the Notorious B.I.G., Jay “[blew] up like the world trade” simultaneously with the World Trade actually blowing up.

Where on Vol. 1, 23 the man had gained mass success by employing the electronic club banger-creators Timbaland and Swizz Beatz and got jiggy with glossmasters the Trackmasters, Irv Gotti and Puff Diddy, and The Dynasty had seen him do something similar with West-coast stalwart Rick Rock and up-and-comers the Neptunes.
On the Blueprint however he elected to primairily work with Roc-a-Fella in-house producers Bink, Just Blaze and Kanye West, all three of whom were test-driven on albums by Jigga’s interns Beanie Sigel and Memphis Bleek (both of whom aren’t anywhere to be found on this album).
These men brought to the studio a somewhat RZA/Pete Rock/DJ Premier-inspired soul-sampling sound that was a lot sunnier and more radio friendly than any track any of those three seminal producers tend to lay down, but still was a far cry from P. Daddy or Irv Gotti’s squeaky clean disco beats, which helped the medicine go down with hip-hop heads and critics, while veteran Jay-Z producers Timbaland and the Trackmasters got one track each, and Eminem, the only guest vocalist who gets to touch on anything beyond a hook, gets to produce the song on which he appears.

Content-wise Jay talks about his own majesty (The Ruler’s Back), how much more succesful he is both commercially and artistically than NaS and Prodigy of Mobb Deep (Takeover), his prowess in courting the ladies (Girls, Girls, Girls), general boasting (Jigga That NiggaIzzo (H.O.V.A.)Hova’ Hovito) and how despite all this success he is still deep down a street hustler (Never Change) and running the hip-hop game (U Don’t Know).
To balance out these rather emotionally vapid, yet entertaining-as-fuck gangsta’isms he throws in a song about how he regrets negatively impacting the lives of those he loves (Song Cry).
Jay-Z had the golden ratio of a commercially succesful gangsta rap album down to a tee pretty much when he dropped Vol. 1. Club bangers (for the ladies) plus just violence and drugs to appease the streets (men) equals platinum sales. And Vol. 2 and 3. as well as the Blueprint all abide to the #oldrules. But these new musical surroundings, as well as challenges to a battle for the throne by NaS and Mobb Deep, appear to have brought Shawn Cory Carter renewed lyrical vigor, as well as the need to mostly have the recording booth to himself while creating the Blueprint (sorry Bleek!).

The resulting album truly is the very best thing this guy has released since his classic debut, and depending on your tastes this one might even be better.
On Reasonable Doubt Jigga was so focused on his lyrical and flowing techniques and the mafioso image he was trying to convey that he came off as a bit statuesque, especially when paired with an playful Notorious B.I.G. who at that point was the undisputed king of New York and thus had little to prove. It never seemed that there was much self-expression on that album and Jigga came off as a cold-hearted technocrat/mafioso/rapping machine.
Over the course of his next string of albums Jay learnt to let loose and have fun a bit recording songs (something NaS has yet to learn after 20+ years in the game, and probably never will), but since none of them but the Blueprint could remotely fuck with Reasonable Doubt production-wise it was only here and now it truly showed.
Basically by 2001 Jay had already snatched up the crown that B.I.G. used to rock via his success (he had once literally attempted to do so on the 1997 Teddy Riley-produced song The City Is Mine, and I say attempted, because it had fallen flat on its face because of it’s cotton candy beat. But a year later Hard Knock Life pretty much actually accomplished Shawn’s coup d’état). And the Blueprint was the consolidation of Hova’s reign over New York, if not the whole of hip-hop.

Izzo (H.O.V.A) had the final bit of the summer of 2001 on smash when it dropped in late august of that year. And for good reason. The celebratory Kanye beat samples the Jackson 5’s I Want You Back in a reasonably creative manner while the Jiggaman celebrates having made the American dream his reality.
Takeover takes apart NaS and Prodigy so ruthlessly efficiently over Kanye’s Fame interpolation (the David Bowie song, not the musical film) that I’m confident that despite this rap war being over ten years ago and having long since resolved, it pisses both artists today still when it comes up on hip-hop radio .
Girls, Girls, Girls marries a confident playa attitude with affection rather than misogyny and goes for broke lyrically over what is the most soulful, and some would say best, beat of the entire album, courtesy of Just Blaze, with light support of three old school legends on the hook (speaking of old school legends, Girls, Girls, Girls [Part 2] which appears as a hidden bonus track on the tail end of the album has an uncredited backing vocal by the late Michael Jackson, returning the favour after Jay appeared on the Trackmasters Remix of You Rock My World)
U Don’t Know has Hova refuting the claim (made by a sped-up vocal sample) that he doesn’t have a master plan in this rap game (as if anyone ever doubted it) and it’s a hustler anthem for the ages.
Song Cry manages to humanise this rap god by having him openly discuss his regrets and insecurities, which helps make it easier for people to root for the guy.

Unsurprisingly the album’s low points are those produced by Timbaland, Trackmasters and Eminem, unsurprising because, as expected, they don’t fit the sped-up ’60s/’70s soul theme and because they rely on gimmicks (though arguably Kanye’s chipmunk soul was a bit of a gimmick too) Jigga That Nigga incorporates bolywood sounds and Hola’ Hovito as Timbaland Having the balls to jump on the latin bandwagon that was a thing around the turn of the millenium. And the freedom-of-speech plea Renegade was better off as the Em-Royce collabo it originally was since Bad Meets Evil unlike Jigga actually racked up controversy with their lyrical content.
But even these songs are pretty entertaining by their own right. It’s not as though they are sucky or anything, it is just that they have the musfortune of sharing an album with a bunch of undisputed classics.

the Blueprint is spotless, and with a lot of derivative albums coming out following its release (not least its very own sequels created by Jay himself) it does its name justice. It is also the argument that convinced this reviewer that Jay-Z, not NaS was the best rapper on the East-Coast in 2001.

Best tracks
Takeover
Izzo (H.O.V.A.)
Girls, Girls, Girls
U Don’t Know
Song Cry
Breathe Easy (Lyrical Exercise)
Girls, Girls, Girls [Part 2]

Recommendations
Pick this one up, a.s.a.p.


Beanie Sigel – The Reason

Beanie Sigel
The Reason
June 26, 2001
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam RecordingsUMG
075/100
Beanie Sigel - The Reason
1. Nothing Like It // 2. Beanie Mack (Bitch) // 3. So What You Saying (feat. Memphis Bleek) // 4. Get Down // 5. I Don’t Do Much // 6. For My Niggas (feat. Daz Dillinger) // 7. Watch Your Bitches // 8. Think It’s a Game (feat. Freeway, Young Chris & Jay-Z) // 9. Man’s World // 10. Gangsta, Gangsta (feat. Kurupt) // 11. Tales of a Hustler (feat. Omilio Sparks) // 12. Mom Praying (feat. Scarface) // 13.Still Got Love For You (feat. Jay-Z & Rell) // 14. What Your Life Like 2

While there remains a strong case for the allegations that Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter was a horrible label boss when it’s gangsta rap that was concerned, with proof found in albums such as Memphis Bleek’s Coming of Age and The Understanding and Amil’s A.M.I.L. (All Money Is Legal), also taking into consideration how good the ROC’s output could‘ve been, e.g.: Sauce Money’s Middle Finger U, there was at one point at the very least one rapper, other than the Jiggaman himself, with both talent behind the microphone and a Roc-a-Fella Record deal.

That rapper, ladies and gentlemen, is Beanie Sigel whose debut album the Truth also went gold solely because of the Roc-a-Fella records logo and because the back-cover said it featured Jay-Z on several songs (one song titled Anything even featured jay-Z by himself, with not a trace of Beans to be found, in a desperate attempt to sell Beans to Jigga’s audience that may or may not have worked.) but in Sigel’s case I can live with that outcome, because unlike Bleek, Sigel is a talent that deserves to be heard.

His second album featured production by some of the relatively new Roc-a-Fella hot-shots Just Blaze and some cat who goes by the name of Kanye West, both of whom brought a new, smooth, classic soul-sampling sound to hip-hop making the Reason a prototype of sorts for Jay-Z’s career re-establishing album the Blueprint (somehow I think there’s a pun in there). Other people who contributed beats were Rick Rock, the miscast West-Coast veteran who worked on the Bleek-Sigel-Jigga triumvirate-album The Dynasty: ROC La Familia, and gets to collect a cheque for turning in his first few failed attempts at creating the not-very-good Change the Game-beat that Sigel had rocked over twice already anyway, on I Don’t Do Much and For My Niggas. Also future G-Unit label president Sha Money XL brings in an instrumental. Besides the previously mentioned Rick Rock-produced songs, and Man’s World and Still Got Love For You which suffer from over-familiar samples being used, all the beats sound fresh.

Guests include Kurupt and Daz on seperate tracks, both of whom had collaborated with the ROC not long before on Jay-Z’s Change the Game [Remix], usual Roc suspects Bleek and Jay-Z, Sigel’s State Property cronies Freeway, Young Chris and Omilio Sparks and Houston-rap veteran, and Sigel’s good friend Scarface. With the exception of Kurupt and Daz, whose verses I cannot recall existing, everyone justifies his presence, and with the guests and the beats being mostly pretty good, all this album needs is Sigel rising up to the challenge of bypassing the imfamous the sophomore slump. Spoiler alert: he more than does.

Having listened to the Reason it is safe to say that Beans had upped his game a bit since the Truth. While that album got by well enough because of the man’s rugged persona and his expert lyrics, it was a bit boring flow-wise. While on the Reason he still isn’t entering NaS or Jay-Z territory he does play around with his flow a little more without dropping the ball, while maintaining the qualities that had him make the Truth such an entertaining album. It’s marginal progress that makes all the difference, and coupled with the new sounds it makes the Reason a better, more interesting album.

Highlights include the vintage Kanye production of Nothing Like It which opens the album, the rowdy Just Blaze-produced-club banger and lead single Beanie Mack (Bitch), and the old-school/P funk-tinged Bleek-collabo So What You Saying, on which Bleek sounds a lot better than on any track of either of his first two solo-albums. The blaxploitation funk-infused pimp-anthem Watch Your Bitches picks up the steam after the lacklustre I Don’t Do Much. And on Think It’s a Game our host and his State Property-boys show why exactly they were signed to the ROC by displaying chemistry with Hov himself. On the knocking Kanye West-produced Gangsta, Gangsta Sigel is joined by fellow philedelphian rapper Kurupt who only appears on the hook, which given his post-Death Row track-record of mostly horrible verse may have been a pretty good idea.

Omilio Sparks, who fullfilled a similarly useless roll as Kurupt did on Gangsta, Gangsta, on Jay-Z’s I Just Wanna Love U (Give It To Me) proves that he’s good for more than meh half-hooks on his verse on Tales of a Hustler, which along with Think It’s a Game makes this reviewer enthousiastic about checking out State Property’s group-debut.

On all these tracks Sigel is the confident gangsta who will rob you at gunpoint, and for those of you who are into that sort of thing Sigel plays the roll well. But for those who want a little humanity with their sex and violence there’s the the emotional sequel to one of the better tracks off his debut in What Your Life Like 2, the Scarface-collabo Mom Crying and (if you’re not sick and tired of rappers rhyming over that exact same Isaac Hayes’ Ike’s Mood 1 loop everytime you play a hip-hop album released during the last twenty years) the sequel to (and the semi-apology for) Where Have You Been which was a middle finger to Sigel and Jay-Z’s absentee fathers, and arguably the best song on The Dynasty: ROC la Familia.

The Reason just barely falls short of being a textbook classic, but at the time it was a more entertaining album than any Jay-Z album since In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 had been, which may have made it one of the more important reasons (no pun intended) for Jay-Z stepping his game up on the Blueprint. And if you’re a fan of unapolagetic, no-frills, well-made gangster rap then forget about that slightly overrated album , which you’ve probably heard in abundance, for just a minute and pick up the massively underrated the Reason, for it will not disappoint you.

Best tracks
Nothing Like It
Beanie Mack (Bitch)
So What You Saying
Watch Your Bitches
Think It’s a Game
Tales of a Hustler
Mom Prayin
What Your Life Like 2

Recommendations
Buy this album.


Jay-Z – The Dynasty: ROC la Familia

Jay-Z
ROC la Familia: The Dynasty
October 30, 2000
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam RecordingsUMG
060/100
Jay-Z - Roc la Familia The Dynasty

1. Intro // 2. Change the Game (feat. Beanie Sigel, Memphis Bleek & Static Major) // 3. I Just Wanna Love U (Give It 2 Me) (feat. Pharrell & Omillio Sparks) // 4. Streets Is Talking (feat. Beanie Sigel) // 5. This Can’t Be Life (feat. Beanie Sigel & Scarface) // 6. Get Your Mind Right Mami (feat. Memphis Bleek, Snoop Dogg & Rell) // 7. Stick 2 the Script (feat. Beanie Sigel & DJ Clue?) // 8. You, Me, Him, Her (feat. Memphis Bleek, Beanie Sigel & Amil) // 9. Guilty Until Proven Innocent (feat. R. Kelly) // 10. Parking Lot Pimpin’ (feat. Beanie Sigel, Memphis Bleek & Lil’ Mo) // 11. Holla (performed by Memphis Bleek) // 12. 1-900-Hustler (feat. Beanie Sigel, Memphis Bleek & Freeway) // 13. The R.O.C. (performed by Beanie Sigel & Memphis Bleek) // 14. Soon You’ll Understand // 15. Squeeze First // 16. Where Have You Been (feat. Beanie Sigel)

Because Bleek, Sigel and Jigga each had gold to platinum albums under their belts (one shouldn’t put Sigel and Bleek in the same league as Hova outside of this context) and because they were all signed to the same record label a group album made sense. That way Beans and Memph could ride Hova’s coattails towards a higher status of celebrity and hopefully even higher album sales, and Hova could play the record label executive he always fancied himself as being, while at the same time helping his boys out.

Amil’s album had gone halfway copper, and therefore she gets but a bunch of namechecks (but not paycheques) as though she were still around (it is entirely possible that she used to actually be on most of these songs but was removed last minute, though not the references to her existence, since that would require a whole lot of re-recording), as well as no more than one verse on this project by a group she was supposed to be an integral part of, which is less than the work she got to put in on the last two Jay-Z solo-albums. Oh well, it’s not like she had anything substantial to offer to the proceedings (although one could argue that neither did Bleek.) Question is: Why not replace her with a more talented rapper, such as for instance Sauce Money?

Anyway, that was the bit about how the actual musical content came into existence. Then someone at Def Jam thought it unlikely that people would give a fuck about a hip-hop supergroup (a group made-up of members who already had careers prior to the group’s existence) mostly because of how well The Firm: the Album did four years prior (I’m just guessing here…) and decided to release the album anyway, but with Jay-Z’s name stamped in an obscenely large font onto the album cover to lure people into believing that this was a Jigga solo-release so that Hova’s fans could find it, in record stores near them. Not only does this album almost exclusively consist of ROC posse cuts (Not counting the intro there are but three songs on here that don’t feature Bleek or Sigel) but two tracks don’t feature the Jiggaman at all, making this the worst case of false advertising since DJ Clue? Presents Backstage Mixtape: A Hard Knock Life. Especially since two out of the three singles released off this project didn’t feature Sigel or Bleek but just Jay-Z and some supporting R&B vocals.

Since this wasn’t actually a Jay-Z solo-album even though it was explicitly marketed as such, Jay decided to not call up Timbaland and Swizz Beatz to produce this album so he could save money on beats fuck around with some new sounds to push the hip-hop genre forward. Fortunately for Hov, Bleek and Mac (and Amil, but not really) the up-and-comers that were hired in stead were the Neptunes, Kanye West and Just Blaze, who would become the genre’s production superstars before long. San Francisco Bay based production veteran Rick Rock also got some play. Hova called in favors from the likes of R. Kelly, Snoop Dogg, Static Major, Lil’ Mo. Sigel snuck two of his State Property boys into the studio and the resulting album would be the worst Jay-Z solo album so-far, if it counted that is.

It’s not all bad though, as usual Jay is good for a couple of catchy singles, most notably the blingy Neptunes helmed come on-number Give It to Me (I Just Wanna Love Ya) featuring Pharrell in an amateur Curtis Mayfield capacity and State Property-member Omillio Sparks in the most useless cameo appearance in recent memory…
Um… But the beat is an okay example of the archetypical Neptunes sound and Jay sleepwalks over it in a pleasant-enough manner, which is all you can expect from radio fodder such as this.

Things get a little more substantial on Guilty Until Proven Innocent on which Hov talk about his (then) recent legal troubles (Hova had allegedly stabbed record executive Lance Rivera for leaking songs ment for Vol. 3)  over a boisterous Rockwilder beat. It is sort of amusing to hear Robert rant about being not guilty on the hook, with his upcoming legal troubles in mind.

Change the Game, the only released single that actually had the rest of the “Dynasty” on it, sucks balls what with its repetetive, bland Rick Rock beat, everybody rapping just coasting along and Static Major’s hook which makes it apparent that the man was bored out of his mind when he recorded it. The same goes for all of Rock’s contributions from the needlessly sparkly Snoop Dogg-assisted Get Your Mind Right to the Lil’ Mo-featuring Parking Lot Pimpin’ to the Hova solo-shot Squeeze 1st.

Just Blaze and Kanye West fare a lot better with their soul-sampling beats that layed the Blueprint for what rap was going to sound like for the years to come (pun intended). Especially Kanye’s sole contribution, the Scarface-featuring This Can’t Be Life is dope, easily the best track on here. Streets Is Talking the sequel of sorts to 1997’s Streets Is Watching isn’t quite as good as its prequel, but it comes close nevertheless. And the Shawn Carter-solo Soon You’ll Understand is a precursor to what greatness was to come on the Blueprint.

The Bink!-produced 1-900 Hustler has all of the Dynasty (well, except Amil off course) plus Freeway, answer called-in questions about gangsta life on a fictitious radio show of the titular name. In spite of, or maybe because of its corny concept and its hilariously graphic execution it works and it is one of the few moments on this album where Roc La Familia shines as a group, as opposed Bleek getting out-rapped by Sigel and Sigel getting out-rapped by Hov. Another point where this supergroup thing actually works is the album closer Where Have You Been on which Jigga and Mac diss the shit out of their absentee father both sounding legitimately emotional, never moreso than the moment where Sigel almost throws up.

Besides these instances of brilliance, as well as the previously mentioned This Can’t Be Life there isn’t much in the form of chemistry to be found amongst the group members. Which is not to say that the Memphis Bleek solo-song is actually good (It is telling that most of what does work doesn’t actually feature Bleek), but yeah this is a serious problem for the success rate which lies comfortably beneath 50%. It is a testamant to how good the good songs are that this got the rating it did get.

Best tracks
I Just Wanna Love U (Give It 2 Me)
Streets Is Talking
This Can’t Be Life
Guilty Until Proven Innocent
1-900-Hustler
Soon You’ll Understand
Where Have You Been

Recommendations
would tell you to pick up the above songs individually off iTunes, Amazon or Spotify if I weren’t convinced that this would cost you more money than to simply buy the album. And the above tracks are certainly worth owning. So I’m going to say: Buy it but just don’t spend over five bucks on it and don’t put it on top of your to do list.


Beanie Sigel – The Truth

Beanie Sigel
The Truth
February 9, 2000
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam Recordings/UMG
070/100
Beanie Sigel - The Truth
1. The Truth // 2. Who Want What (feat. Memphis Bleek) // 3. Raw & Uncut (feat. Jay-Z) // 4. Mac Man // 5. Playa (feat. Amil & Jay-Z) // 6. Everybody Wanna Be a Star // 7. Remember Them Days (feat. Eve) // 8. Stop, Chill // 9. Mac & Brad (feat. Scarface) // 10. What a Thug About // 11. What Ya Life Like // 12. Ride 4 My //13. Die // 14. Anything (performed by Jay-Z)

Spit like August
I’m “the Truth” I’m not lying

I’m the reason why Jay feel comfortable retiring.

That line taken from Sigel’s guest verse on Jigga’s Pop 4 Roc is both a pretty straightforward announcement of this album hitting stores soon and quite the claim indeed. Considering Jay-Z was and is considered one of New York’s finest rappers, and Sigel, well… at that time nobody actually knew who he was. But let’s be honest; If Jay ever were to deliver on his threat to retire it wouldn’t be because motherfucking Mempis Bleek could hold down Roc-a-Fella records in his absence (Sorry Bleek!)

Sigel first made some noise appearing on Jay-Z’s Resevoir Dogs, as well as songs by Memphis Bleek, Puff Diddy and the Roots. Hailing from Philadelphia he was one of the first non-New York artists on Roc-a-Fella, and certainly the first one to get to release an album there paving the way for a certain Kanye West, who supplies his first Roc-a-Fella production contribution here, but was still years away from a rap career.

Jay’s Vol. 3… Life and Times of S. Carter had already seen the Roc moving away somewhat from the pop-rap sounds that had made Vol. 1Vol. 2 and to a lesser extent Memphis Bleek’s Coming of Age hit albums. But The Truth takes this movement to the next level and likes to pretend the R&B charts don’t exist. There’s zero R&B hooks and no expensive-ass Timbaland/ Swizz Beatz club tracks making this an album one for hip-hop heads only. In fact, one can easily imagine Jigga hearing the final product, panicking about who the hell would buy a rap-album without lame-ass pop concessions and included his own Oliver!-sampling  mediocre-ass Hard Knock Life-reprise Anything as a bonus-track, in a final attempt to seduce the ladies into buying The Truth.

The album features thirteen tracks (not counting Anything because Beans ain’t got shit to do with it) produced by a myriad of producers. In the hands of a less capable rapper this would lead to a sonic chaos. But Sigel pulls it together with his snarling, agressive style somewhat reminiscent of Ice Cube at his most angry. Unlike Coming of Age The Truth isn’t an amateur’s rendition of In My Lifetime, Vol. 1Kicking off with the early Kanye production/ title track Beans grabs the listener by the throat with his sheer intensity. He’s not a technichian the way Jay-Z is, his flows are relatively simple compared to those of his boss, rather it’s the way he makes one feel his words. Finding highlights is hard since Sigel couldn’t be bothered to cater to the radio, one should rather take the Truth as a whole. Nevertheless; Raw & Uncut may be the umpteenth song comparing hip-hop music to some narcotic but Beans seems invested enough in his performance, the blaxploitation-inspired beat is nice and groovy. It also has a nice back-and-forth going on between our host and the guy who signs his paychecks. (No such luck with the Memph Bleek-duet Who Want What, what with Roc-a-Fella production neophyte Just Blaze giving Sigel his impression of a Swizz Beat, or the Amil-feature Playa that comes thisclose to being a radio song, lacking only listenability. It truly seems that the only people with talent in on the Roc-a-Fella payroll at this time were Jay and Sigel) An even better match for Sigel to duet here is Houston rap-vetaran Scarface who gets down with our host on the simply titled Mac & Brad over an understated instrumental. The fact that Beans holds his own here is definitely proof the man is no joke. The only complaint I can come up with here is that they fade out the track while Face is still rapping, the fuck? But arguably Beans is best served solo. The title track, Stop, ChillWhat a Thug AboutWhat Your Life Like and Die are the must succesful showcases of Sigel’s gangsta raps served neat, with no ice. Especially the latter on which the man contemplates what violent, unpleasant way he’ll meet his maker given that death is certain and he lives the gangsta lifestyle, over an atypically mournful Prestige beat.

As good as these highlights are it’s not all good here. Remember them Days has a cotton candy of an instrumental and puts three perfectly seviceable Beans verses and a meh Eve hook to waste. Mac Man is a overly gimmicky shitstorm with it’s video game sample (guess which one!) and then there’s the previously mentioned Roc-a-Fella guest appearances on Who Want What and Playa.

But if you kept count you’ll have noticed that the good mostly outways the bad here, and Sigel more or less gives off the idea that although Jay’s crown would be a bit too heavy for him (Beans could never maintain a constant charts presence like Jigga man has been doing from ’96 ’til now.) But there’s no doubt he could keep the Roc relevant in the absence of Shawn Carter.

Unfortunately for our host things wouldn’t end up remotely like that, but that story is for another day.

Best tracks
The Truth
Raw & Uncut
Stop, Chill
Mac & Brad
What a Thug About
What Your Life Like
Die

Recommendations
Pick this one up.


Drake – So Far Gone

Drake

So Far Gone

October’s Very Own

13-02-2009

Drake is an enigma to me. How can such an expressionless, goody two shoes lame-o who as far as I’ve actually heard anything of his hasn’t had an original idea in his life, get so much exposure. Seriously, if Drake proves anything by his success it is that hiphop is dead while autotune and emo-culture will plague us for the rest of eternity.

Anyway, Aubrey “Drake” Graham (although Drake is actually his middle name so perhaps the quotation marks are redundant) hails from Toronto, Canada. He rose to fame by playing a wheelchair bound character in the Canadian teen drama Degrassi: the Next Generation and gained so much street cred in doing so he though he would be a fantastic rapper. Inspired by T-Pain’s ascent he found himself an incredibly talented singer, too and he got it cracking recording a bunch of mixtapes which he released independently, including his third: So Far Gone. This one became so successful that a hit single Best I Ever Had was released off it and some of the tracks, the ones which didn’t steal expensive-to-clear bits and pieces from the Swedish hipster Indie rock or rap music Mr. Graham likes to listen to, were commercially released as the So Far Gone EP. Since then Drake released his debut studio album Thank Me Later which sold a lot of copies. Also, he has gained a lot of imitators such as Wiz Khalifa, although Wiz only sounds like him. He raps about Pittsburg and pot rather than having sex while crying. My quest to find out why anybody gives a fuck begins with reviewing the So Far Gone mixtape. I am not looking forward to this as I take the guy about as seriously as, or maybe even less than fellow Canadian jackass Justin Bieber.

Let’s do this…

1. Lust For Life

Some really spacey atmospheric strings and something, which could be either a percussion or some form of scratching, provide the backdrop for Drake to spit some somewhat clever bars over, and even though he throws in some auto-tuned singing this isn’t bad an introduction, I guess.

2. Houstatlantavegas

I’m not sure what houstatlantavegasing someone is supposed to mean. As far as I can tell it’s a euphemism for some deviant sexual act. Musically this is pretty much a direct continuation of Lust For Life. Because Drake at the time of So Far Gone’s release was probably still living of Degrassi paychecks, as he hadn’t yet released any material anything anyone could (or would?) pay for, he resorts to throw his Canadian $1,-s in the sky rather than the higher denominations which other, richer rappers would toss into the air in the name of “swag”. At least that what I think he means.

3. Succesful (feat. Trey Songz & Lil Wayne)

There’s no real reason to insert Trey Songz into one of your songs ever, unless you want people’s reactions to be “Has Ne-Yo become even more generic?” if they choose to react at all, that is. So far the instrumentals of So Far Gone all sound the same; like the audio-equivalent of how the after-effects of mdma feel to me, which isn’t pleasant or unpleasant. It is numb rather. Weezy has gotten a lot of criticism for rhyming exactly like Drake does ever since the two hooked up. People who say that are pretty much dead on.

4. Let’s Call It Off (feat. Peter Bjorn & John)

A lot has been said on blogs about Aubrey jumping onto the instrumental of Swedish indie rock band Peter Bjork & John’s Let’s Call It Off and leaving part of their original vocals in. Three things strike me about this. [one] This sounds precisely as bland as most of the motherfucking genre the original belongs to does to me, which helps Let’s Call It Off slip seamlessly onto So Far Gone. [two] The vocals of the original song’s artists are so effectively mixed into the background that they convey either a misguided attempt at subtlety or a rather large lack of confidence on Peter Bjork & John’s part in their own vocal performances. (although I didn’t look up the original, so I wouldn’t know whether or not they are responsible for how they were mixed in here) [three] This would be the most obvious mixtape moment of So Far Gone so far, since everything leading up to this had original beats, and to license this for a commercially available album would be pretty expensive.

5. November 18th

Since the guy who allegedly produced Novemner 18th, DJ Screw had been dead for the better part of 10 years when this came out this was either swapped from something he produced before he died or something previously unused taken from his vaults. I will say the combination of the chopped ‘n’ screwed vocals sampled from the Notorious B.I.G.’s Warning and Drake’s auto-tuned ones create a potent contrast but that’s about all there is to this so meh.

6. Ignorant Shit (feat. Lil’ Wayne)

This steals Just Blaze’s beat to Jay-Z’s song of the same title which samples the faster part of The isley Brothers’ quiet storm classic Between the Sheets. It’s a’aight I guess. Both Drizzy and Weezy provide some clever punchlines sans hook the best of which is Weezy’s sizzurp-fried assertion that “[he’s] so high [he] can vomit on a comet”. Jay’s version original featuring Beanie Sigel is still a lot better though, but that’s mostly because I prefer the Jiggaman’s cocky swag raps to Drake’s hipster emo bullshit. Finally, Drake seems to have forgotten the entire Ignorant Shit theme while Wayne rarely deviates from it ever in his entire career and doesn’t start here.

7. A Night Off (feat. Lloyd)

At the end of Ignorant Shit the beat gets slowed down and it bleeds into this track which sounds a lot like the minimalist first three songs off this mixtape. To hear an autotuned Drake and girly ass sounding R&B singer Lloyd sing come-ons (seemingly directed at one another) wasn’t very satisfying both musically and intellectually so no, this isn’t very good.

8. Say What’s Real

More minimalistic ambient sounding shit. This one is more bleep centric than most of what came before it. The beat used here was swiped from one of Kanye’s 808 & Heartbreak songs. Kanye’s depressed version seems to have inspired each and every bit of everything Drake has done ever.

9. Little Bit (feat. Likke Ly)

Apparently Aubrey Listens to a lot of Swedish pop music and likes to duet these artists making it on mixtapes without their actual participation or consent. I wonder when ABBA gets the treatment.

10. Best I Ever Had

This was a hit single, which free mixtapes don’t generally have but whatever, the instrumentation, courtesy of now-hit producer Boi-1da is a lot richer and upbeat than what we’ve heard on this mixtape so far. Basically this is about how some girl is the best Drake ever fucked, although our host doesn’t do a very convincing job spreading that message. I never gave much of fuck about this song hearing it on the radio or on MTV but in the context of this mixtape-album it sounds pretty fucking awesome, but that says more about how dull everything before this is.

11. Unstoppable (feat. Santigold & Lil Wayne)

I never took the time to listen to Santigold so I can’t tell you which one of her creations gets raped and pillaged right here, or whether it’s an improvement. I will say Lil Wayne’s performance sucks big floppy donkey dick on this song and I’m getting pretty goddamn sick of So Far Gone by now.

12. Uptown (feat. Bun B & Lil Wayne)

This Boi-1da production sounds like a codeine fried, bouncy, southern-hiphop track, which it should, I suppose since it features Bun B, whose UGK buddy Pimp C killed himself by drinking too much sizzurp and Lil Wayne, who’s probably right in the middle that exact same process right now. This isn’t half bad, though.

13. Sooner Or Later

Also, Drake sounds like a fucking creep through autotune in my humble opinion.

14. Bria’s Interlude (feat. Omarion)

Was B2K’s Omarion in 2009 even relevant enough to be put on an interlude of a free mixtape? I can’t make up who the hell Bria is supposed to be by listening to this, or why she wasn’t worthy of a song-length ode, so this was many different kinds of useless.

15. The Calm

The title is an utter and complete misfit. Otherwise, a brand new track but more of the same ol’ bullshit I’ve heard far too much of…

16. Brand New

This is much more straightforward R&B than most of this project. If Ne-Yo was an autotuned emo he would’ve recorded this shit. And So Far Gone is through, finally.

Best track
Ignorant Shit, Best I Ever Had, Uptown

Conclusions

Drake’s version of “hiphop” is mostly outright neutered R&B emo. Drake seems to do very little satisfying things in his little superstar life. He sleeps with a lot of women but after he’s done fucking you and before he moves on to the next one he’ll complain to you about how hollow you have made him feel, ladies be warned. Also, the style Drake uses on here is almost completely jacked from Kanye’s minimalistic autotuned R&B album 808’s & Heartbreak, which was in and by itself not a fantastic album to begin with. The only reason this gets spin which I can think of, is because today’s hipster youth seems to like to believe thaey are as without direction and numb as the character which Drake portrays does, which is just sad really. The guy isn’t a terrible rapper per se but here he has used his skills to make a sterile mood album in which all the songs run together and everything is meh in from his point of view. Even when he does boast about whatever riches he owns or about all the women wanting to sleep with him it seems like he just does that because he thinks it makes him more “hiphop”, rather than any sort of genuine excitement he feels about it. The best track on here is Ignorant Shit but that’s just some blatant beat swiping from a superior song so yeah, this wasn’t enjoyable, at all.

Recommendations

This one is for the skinny jeans wearing, Pabst blue ribbon-sipping, “OMG, Jackson Pollock is such a fantastic painter.”, phat glasses with clear lenses sporting, progressive leftist, “bi-curious”, “I used to like this band, until they sold out”, melancholic, planking, “You cannot ever grasp what I am trying to convey in this haiku!, “mainstream-hater” only. Of you’re not one of those So Far Gone will probably either put you to sleep or make you lose your temper. Then again it is available for free, and while I’m not a fan the kids do seem to like this douchebag, so besides a loss of your time and confusion about what the fuck has happened to the world and hiphop in particular lately, you haven’t got much to lose. I hope this doesn’t come across as me daring you to listen to this. I don’t. You shouldn’t give a fuck about this. Really.