Tag Archives: Scarface

Beanie Sigel – The Reason

Beanie Sigel
The Reason
June 26, 2001
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam RecordingsUMG
075/100
Beanie Sigel - The Reason
1. Nothing Like It // 2. Beanie Mack (Bitch) // 3. So What You Saying (feat. Memphis Bleek) // 4. Get Down // 5. I Don’t Do Much // 6. For My Niggas (feat. Daz Dillinger) // 7. Watch Your Bitches // 8. Think It’s a Game (feat. Freeway, Young Chris & Jay-Z) // 9. Man’s World // 10. Gangsta, Gangsta (feat. Kurupt) // 11. Tales of a Hustler (feat. Omilio Sparks) // 12. Mom Praying (feat. Scarface) // 13.Still Got Love For You (feat. Jay-Z & Rell) // 14. What Your Life Like 2

While there remains a strong case for the allegations that Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter was a horrible label boss when it’s gangsta rap that was concerned, with proof found in albums such as Memphis Bleek’s Coming of Age and The Understanding and Amil’s A.M.I.L. (All Money Is Legal), also taking into consideration how good the ROC’s output could‘ve been, e.g.: Sauce Money’s Middle Finger U, there was at one point at the very least one rapper, other than the Jiggaman himself, with both talent behind the microphone and a Roc-a-Fella Record deal.

That rapper, ladies and gentlemen, is Beanie Sigel whose debut album the Truth also went gold solely because of the Roc-a-Fella records logo and because the back-cover said it featured Jay-Z on several songs (one song titled Anything even featured jay-Z by himself, with not a trace of Beans to be found, in a desperate attempt to sell Beans to Jigga’s audience that may or may not have worked.) but in Sigel’s case I can live with that outcome, because unlike Bleek, Sigel is a talent that deserves to be heard.

His second album featured production by some of the relatively new Roc-a-Fella hot-shots Just Blaze and some cat who goes by the name of Kanye West, both of whom brought a new, smooth, classic soul-sampling sound to hip-hop making the Reason a prototype of sorts for Jay-Z’s career re-establishing album the Blueprint (somehow I think there’s a pun in there). Other people who contributed beats were Rick Rock, the miscast West-Coast veteran who worked on the Bleek-Sigel-Jigga triumvirate-album The Dynasty: ROC La Familia, and gets to collect a cheque for turning in his first few failed attempts at creating the not-very-good Change the Game-beat that Sigel had rocked over twice already anyway, on I Don’t Do Much and For My Niggas. Also future G-Unit label president Sha Money XL brings in an instrumental. Besides the previously mentioned Rick Rock-produced songs, and Man’s World and Still Got Love For You which suffer from over-familiar samples being used, all the beats sound fresh.

Guests include Kurupt and Daz on seperate tracks, both of whom had collaborated with the ROC not long before on Jay-Z’s Change the Game [Remix], usual Roc suspects Bleek and Jay-Z, Sigel’s State Property cronies Freeway, Young Chris and Omilio Sparks and Houston-rap veteran, and Sigel’s good friend Scarface. With the exception of Kurupt and Daz, whose verses I cannot recall existing, everyone justifies his presence, and with the guests and the beats being mostly pretty good, all this album needs is Sigel rising up to the challenge of bypassing the imfamous the sophomore slump. Spoiler alert: he more than does.

Having listened to the Reason it is safe to say that Beans had upped his game a bit since the Truth. While that album got by well enough because of the man’s rugged persona and his expert lyrics, it was a bit boring flow-wise. While on the Reason he still isn’t entering NaS or Jay-Z territory he does play around with his flow a little more without dropping the ball, while maintaining the qualities that had him make the Truth such an entertaining album. It’s marginal progress that makes all the difference, and coupled with the new sounds it makes the Reason a better, more interesting album.

Highlights include the vintage Kanye production of Nothing Like It which opens the album, the rowdy Just Blaze-produced-club banger and lead single Beanie Mack (Bitch), and the old-school/P funk-tinged Bleek-collabo So What You Saying, on which Bleek sounds a lot better than on any track of either of his first two solo-albums. The blaxploitation funk-infused pimp-anthem Watch Your Bitches picks up the steam after the lacklustre I Don’t Do Much. And on Think It’s a Game our host and his State Property-boys show why exactly they were signed to the ROC by displaying chemistry with Hov himself. On the knocking Kanye West-produced Gangsta, Gangsta Sigel is joined by fellow philedelphian rapper Kurupt who only appears on the hook, which given his post-Death Row track-record of mostly horrible verse may have been a pretty good idea.

Omilio Sparks, who fullfilled a similarly useless roll as Kurupt did on Gangsta, Gangsta, on Jay-Z’s I Just Wanna Love U (Give It To Me) proves that he’s good for more than meh half-hooks on his verse on Tales of a Hustler, which along with Think It’s a Game makes this reviewer enthousiastic about checking out State Property’s group-debut.

On all these tracks Sigel is the confident gangsta who will rob you at gunpoint, and for those of you who are into that sort of thing Sigel plays the roll well. But for those who want a little humanity with their sex and violence there’s the the emotional sequel to one of the better tracks off his debut in What Your Life Like 2, the Scarface-collabo Mom Crying and (if you’re not sick and tired of rappers rhyming over that exact same Isaac Hayes’ Ike’s Mood 1 loop everytime you play a hip-hop album released during the last twenty years) the sequel to (and the semi-apology for) Where Have You Been which was a middle finger to Sigel and Jay-Z’s absentee fathers, and arguably the best song on The Dynasty: ROC la Familia.

The Reason just barely falls short of being a textbook classic, but at the time it was a more entertaining album than any Jay-Z album since In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 had been, which may have made it one of the more important reasons (no pun intended) for Jay-Z stepping his game up on the Blueprint. And if you’re a fan of unapolagetic, no-frills, well-made gangster rap then forget about that slightly overrated album , which you’ve probably heard in abundance, for just a minute and pick up the massively underrated the Reason, for it will not disappoint you.

Best tracks
Nothing Like It
Beanie Mack (Bitch)
So What You Saying
Watch Your Bitches
Think It’s a Game
Tales of a Hustler
Mom Prayin
What Your Life Like 2

Recommendations
Buy this album.


Beanie Sigel – The Truth

Beanie Sigel
The Truth
February 9, 2000
Roc-a-Fella RecordsDef Jam Recordings/UMG
070/100
Beanie Sigel - The Truth
1. The Truth // 2. Who Want What (feat. Memphis Bleek) // 3. Raw & Uncut (feat. Jay-Z) // 4. Mac Man // 5. Playa (feat. Amil & Jay-Z) // 6. Everybody Wanna Be a Star // 7. Remember Them Days (feat. Eve) // 8. Stop, Chill // 9. Mac & Brad (feat. Scarface) // 10. What a Thug About // 11. What Ya Life Like // 12. Ride 4 My //13. Die // 14. Anything (performed by Jay-Z)

Spit like August
I’m “the Truth” I’m not lying

I’m the reason why Jay feel comfortable retiring.

That line taken from Sigel’s guest verse on Jigga’s Pop 4 Roc is both a pretty straightforward announcement of this album hitting stores soon and quite the claim indeed. Considering Jay-Z was and is considered one of New York’s finest rappers, and Sigel, well… at that time nobody actually knew who he was. But let’s be honest; If Jay ever were to deliver on his threat to retire it wouldn’t be because motherfucking Mempis Bleek could hold down Roc-a-Fella records in his absence (Sorry Bleek!)

Sigel first made some noise appearing on Jay-Z’s Resevoir Dogs, as well as songs by Memphis Bleek, Puff Diddy and the Roots. Hailing from Philadelphia he was one of the first non-New York artists on Roc-a-Fella, and certainly the first one to get to release an album there paving the way for a certain Kanye West, who supplies his first Roc-a-Fella production contribution here, but was still years away from a rap career.

Jay’s Vol. 3… Life and Times of S. Carter had already seen the Roc moving away somewhat from the pop-rap sounds that had made Vol. 1Vol. 2 and to a lesser extent Memphis Bleek’s Coming of Age hit albums. But The Truth takes this movement to the next level and likes to pretend the R&B charts don’t exist. There’s zero R&B hooks and no expensive-ass Timbaland/ Swizz Beatz club tracks making this an album one for hip-hop heads only. In fact, one can easily imagine Jigga hearing the final product, panicking about who the hell would buy a rap-album without lame-ass pop concessions and included his own Oliver!-sampling  mediocre-ass Hard Knock Life-reprise Anything as a bonus-track, in a final attempt to seduce the ladies into buying The Truth.

The album features thirteen tracks (not counting Anything because Beans ain’t got shit to do with it) produced by a myriad of producers. In the hands of a less capable rapper this would lead to a sonic chaos. But Sigel pulls it together with his snarling, agressive style somewhat reminiscent of Ice Cube at his most angry. Unlike Coming of Age The Truth isn’t an amateur’s rendition of In My Lifetime, Vol. 1Kicking off with the early Kanye production/ title track Beans grabs the listener by the throat with his sheer intensity. He’s not a technichian the way Jay-Z is, his flows are relatively simple compared to those of his boss, rather it’s the way he makes one feel his words. Finding highlights is hard since Sigel couldn’t be bothered to cater to the radio, one should rather take the Truth as a whole. Nevertheless; Raw & Uncut may be the umpteenth song comparing hip-hop music to some narcotic but Beans seems invested enough in his performance, the blaxploitation-inspired beat is nice and groovy. It also has a nice back-and-forth going on between our host and the guy who signs his paychecks. (No such luck with the Memph Bleek-duet Who Want What, what with Roc-a-Fella production neophyte Just Blaze giving Sigel his impression of a Swizz Beat, or the Amil-feature Playa that comes thisclose to being a radio song, lacking only listenability. It truly seems that the only people with talent in on the Roc-a-Fella payroll at this time were Jay and Sigel) An even better match for Sigel to duet here is Houston rap-vetaran Scarface who gets down with our host on the simply titled Mac & Brad over an understated instrumental. The fact that Beans holds his own here is definitely proof the man is no joke. The only complaint I can come up with here is that they fade out the track while Face is still rapping, the fuck? But arguably Beans is best served solo. The title track, Stop, ChillWhat a Thug AboutWhat Your Life Like and Die are the must succesful showcases of Sigel’s gangsta raps served neat, with no ice. Especially the latter on which the man contemplates what violent, unpleasant way he’ll meet his maker given that death is certain and he lives the gangsta lifestyle, over an atypically mournful Prestige beat.

As good as these highlights are it’s not all good here. Remember them Days has a cotton candy of an instrumental and puts three perfectly seviceable Beans verses and a meh Eve hook to waste. Mac Man is a overly gimmicky shitstorm with it’s video game sample (guess which one!) and then there’s the previously mentioned Roc-a-Fella guest appearances on Who Want What and Playa.

But if you kept count you’ll have noticed that the good mostly outways the bad here, and Sigel more or less gives off the idea that although Jay’s crown would be a bit too heavy for him (Beans could never maintain a constant charts presence like Jigga man has been doing from ’96 ’til now.) But there’s no doubt he could keep the Roc relevant in the absence of Shawn Carter.

Unfortunately for our host things wouldn’t end up remotely like that, but that story is for another day.

Best tracks
The Truth
Raw & Uncut
Stop, Chill
Mac & Brad
What a Thug About
What Your Life Like
Die

Recommendations
Pick this one up.


Irv Gotti Presents: The Remixes

Various Artists
Irv Gotti Presents: the Remixes
November 5, 2002
Murder Inc. Records/ Def Jam Recordings/ UMG
050/100
Irv Gotti Presents the Remixes

1. The Remixes [Skit] // 2. Unfoolish (Ashanti feat. the Notorious B.I.G.) // 3. I’m So Happy (Ashanti feat. Charlie Baltimore, D.O. Cannons & Young Merc) // 4. The Pledge [Remix] (Ashanti, Ja Rule, NaS & 2pac) // 5. O.G. [Remix] (Black Child & Caddilac Tah) // 6. Boss [Skit] // 7. Me & My Boyfriend (Toni Braxton feat. 2pac) // 8. Come-N-Go (Ashanti, Ja Rule, Caddilac Tah & 7Aurelius) // 9. Poverlous (Caddilac Tah)  // 10. Spanish Dancing [Skit] // 11. Rainy Dayz [Remix] (Mary J. Blige feat. Ja Rule) // 12. Moreno [Skit] // 13. Baby [Remix] (Ashanti feat. Scarface) // 14. Hard Livin’ (D.O. Cannons & Young Merc) // 15. No One Does It Better (Black Child, Caddilac Tah & Ja Rule) // 16. Remo’s Back [Skit] // 17. We Dem Boyz (Let’s Ride) (Chink Santana, D.O. Cannons & Young Merc) // 18. Baby [Remix] (Ashanti feat. Crooked I)

Remixes of tried and true hits and some added bonuses in the form of new tracks by Caddilac Tah and Black Child and some new cats (groan). 2pac involentarily pops up on two tracks, one of which, a Toni Braxton song, at least techically actually could have happened back in the ’90s because both Toni and Pac were around, and which started a beef between Braxton and Jay-Z who sampled the same pac song for his ’03 Bonnie & Clyde.

Scarface his vocals, featured first on a song called Mary Jane are reused for a remix of Ashanti’s Baby because the original already had stolen its beat already anyway. Then at the tail end of this dated novelty project a horribly miscast Crooked I re-does the re-mix in order to appear in full Ja Rule-capacity in its video, complete with mink coat. (I’m sure he doesn’t like it Joe, Joell and Royce bring that shit up.)

But hey some of the Ashanti tracks aren’t horrible, except for Unfoolish, which although it doesn’t sound bad, we had heard already on her own album, and which graverobs Biggie and morbidly puts him on the same album as 2pac, they’re all welcome additions to het catalogue. I’m So Happy more or less swipes the beat from the Gap Band’s Outstanding, which the original titled Happy did in a much more subtle manner, and The Pledge [Remix] replaces Caddilac Tah with NaS (no complaints there besides the 2pac thing.)

Besides Irv ruining Jeffrey’s Mary J. Blige duet Rainiy Dayz nobody does anything else worth mentioning so I’mma call it a day.

Best tracks
I’m So Happy, The Pledge [Remix], Baby [Remix] (Crooked I version)

Recommendations
What do you think?


The Fast and the Furious (OST)

Various Artists
The Fast and the Furious (OST)
June 5, 2001
Murder Inc. Records/ Def Jam Recordings/ UMG
050/100

1. Good Life [Remix] (Faith Evans feat. Ja Rule, Vita & Caddilac Tah) // 2. Pov City Anthem (Caddilac Tah) // 3. When a Man Does Wrong (Ashanti) // 4. Race Against Time II (Tank feat. Ja Rule) // 5. Furious (Ja Rule feat. Vita & 0-1) // 6. Take My Time Tonight (R. Kelly) // 7. Suicide (Scarface feat. Irv Gotti) // 8. The Prayer (Black Child) // 9. Tudunn Tudunn Tudunn (Funkmaster Flex feat. Noreaga) // 10. Hustlin’ (Fat Joe & Armageddon) // 11. Freestyle (Boo & Gotti) // 12. Rollin’ (Urban Assault Vehicle) (Limp Bizkit feat. DMX, Method man & Redman) // 13. Life Ain’t a Game (Ja Rule) // 14. Cali Diseaz (Shade Sheist feat. Nate Dogg) // 15. Didn’t I (Petey Pablo) 16. Put It On Me [Remix] (Ja Rule feat. Vita & Lil’ Mo) // 17. Justify My Love (Vita feat. Ashanti)

It’s a testament of Murder Inc. records’ popularity around the turn of the millenium that they were given the responsibility to create the soundtrack to the first volume in the series of underwhelming high budget Hollywood blockbuster films that seems to never stop spawning sequels that is the Fast and The Furious.

Since Irv Gotti was instrumental in bringing Jay-Z, DMX and Ja Rule to the general public one has to wonder what the hell happened to his tastes in rap music between those days and the moment Def Jam granted him his own label Murder Inc. Records. That was more or less the point I tried to make in my Irv Gotti Presents… the Murderers review. And it rings tue here too. Vita, Caddilac Tah and Black Child ruin an otherwise perfectly functional opening track: Faith Evans’ Good Life [Remix]. When they get to suck on their own the results are even worse. Pov City Anthem, The Prayer and Justify My Love are two instances of instantly skippable loudmouth wanksta rap and a ridiculous cover of a ridiculous Madonna song. Ja Rule himself doesn’t come off too well  either. Fuck You, lifted from his horrible sophomore album Rule 3:36, justifies DMX’s complaints about Ja taking his style and pissing all over it. Life Ain’t a Game has him sing-howling his way through a pseudo futuristic DaMizza beat. The one Rule joint here that warrant repeated listens is the radio edit of his hit single Put It On Me, which now includes Lil’ Mo. Since Ja’s 2000 solo album 3:36 includes an inferior Lil’ Mo-less version of the song there’s quite literally no reason to buy that. If anything that might give this album a raison d’être. And even that track is more of a “Haha, can you believe we used to listen to that shit ten years ago?” kind of guilty pleasure-y thing rather than an actual good song.

Luckily there’s more to it than Ja and Irv Gotti’s merry band of soon-to-be-stars this time around. Tank’s rendition of Ja Rule’s Race Against Time sounds pretty good. R. Kelly does his R. Kelly thing on Take My Time Tonight which will neither gain nor cost the man fans. Suicide has southern hip-hop veteran Scarface flip a line from Snoop Dogg’s Serial Killa to decent effectand for fansof Shade Sheist, Petey Pablo, Boo & Gotti, Terror Squad, Noreaga (you’re forgiven if you’ve never heard of any of these artists, none of them are relevant any more) and fucking Limp Bizkit there’s something to be found here.

Production varies from decent (Suicide, Race Against Time) to horrible (Rollin’ (Urban Assault Vehicle), Life Ain’t A Game). And so does everything else. This makes for incredibly inessential listening. Still, for the Murder inc. Record label this was a step up after Irv Gotti presents… The Murderers and Rule 3:36. In part this has to do with the hired talent but also with their latest signee Ashanti and their new producer 7Aurelius. Perhaps Pain Is Love will be the first Murder Inc. Release since Venni Vetti Vecci that will not be a chore to listen to, huh?

Best tracks
Race Against Time II, Suicide, Put It On Me [Remix], *Good Life [Remix]

*Technically not on any edition of this soundtrack, but most likely found on a DJ Clue mixtape. Replaces the Ain’t No Nigga beat with a less distractingly familiar one. It also replaces bullshit Caddilac Tah and Vita verses with lukewarm but inoffensive Ja Rule.

Recommendations
Buy the above tracks off Amazon.